In The Space Between

Growing up in Southern Germany at Langenburg castle, the ancient family seat of the House of Hohenlohe, Cécile zu Hohenlohe was exposed to art and antiques from a very early age. One of her favorite treasures was an old jewel casket that had belonged to her great grandmother, Princess Alexandra of Saxe-Coburg, and originally housed a dowry of rubies and diamonds gifted by the Tsar. The three trays of deep-blue velvet and silk had retained traces of the jewels that formally lived in the case, and rather than acting as reminders of loss, these traces proved to become a source of great inspiration for Cécile.

Cecile zu Hohenlohe - jewelry - L’ArcoBaleno blog Photo courtesy of Cecile zu Hohenlohe.

After attending art school in London during her late teens, Cécile worked in Tom Dixon’s workshop (in a very hands-on capacity), and later managed his acclaimed gallery Space. Leaving London in the mid-nineties, Cécile launched the art book program at TeNeues Publishing in New York, and has been working more recently, from both New York and Paris, in an advisory capacity with contemporary designers, artisans, and producers such as the renowned porcelain manufacturer Nymphenburg.

Cecile zu Hohenlohe - jewelry - L’ArcoBaleno blog Cécile zu Hohenlohe’s studio in the Langenburg castle.
Photo courtesy of Cecile zu Hohenlohe.

Inspired by a quote from Tibetan sage Milarepa, “In the gap between thoughts, concept-free wisdom continuously shines forth,” Cécile has begun creating her own line of jewelry. Her collection of stunningly, and unexpectedly effortless, hand sculptures  are made from selections of precious and semi-precious stones. Made specifically for either the left or right hand, the rings include stones sourced from the Hohenlohe family estate and grounds, Langenburg castle, and from her travels around the world and from stone dealers she connected with along the way.

After meeting with Cécile earlier this year, I’m tremendously pleased to tell you that we have some of her exquisite rings now available through our Shop. A big thank you to Murray Moss and Franklin Getchell for introducing Cécile and her wonderful work to me!

Cecile zu Hohenlohe - jewelry - L’ArcoBaleno blog Cécile zu Hohenlohe and her mother, H.S.H. Princess Charlotte zu Hohenlohe-Langenburg. Highlighted is the diamond and ruby engagement ring that Cécile incorporated into her Lotus Ring. Photo courtesy of Cecile zu Hohenlohe.

Cecile zu Hohenlohe - jewelry - L’ArcoBaleno blog The Lotus Ring. A personal piece made from her mother’s engagement ring (pictured above) paired with a piece of molten bronze, a remnant from the Lotus tiara, that was found in the ashes after a fire devastated Langenburg Castle.

Cecile zu Hohenlohe - jewelry - L’ArcoBaleno blog

Cecile zu Hohenlohe - jewelry - L’ArcoBaleno blog The blue velvet and silk lined trays from the jewel casket which had belonged to her great grandmother. Photos courtesy of Cecile zu Hohenlohe.

Cecile zu Hohenlohe - CZH ring with pink tourmaline - L’ArcoBaleno blog

Cecile zu Hohenlohe - CZH ring with Garnet - L’ArcoBaleno blog

Cecile zu Hohenlohe - CZH ring with green tourmaline - L’ArcoBaleno blog

***

Check out our selection of Cécile zu Hohenlohe rings in the L’ArcoBaleno shop.

All images, except the last three, are courtesy of Cécile zu Hohenlohe.

Vielen Dank für Ihre Bewerbung beim Pamono Trade Club!

Unser Concierge-Team überprüft Ihre Anfrage und wird sich bald mit Ihnen in Verbindung setzen, um Ihre Handelsvorteile freizuschalten. Ihr Standard-Konto ist bereits aktiv!

Haben Sie es eilig? Rufen Sie uns an 1-800-601-2340

© 2019 Pamono GmbH. Impressum